George Vondriska teaches you how to build a stool that will look great in either your home or workshop. He walks you step by step through the entire process, showing you how to complete each of the necessary woodworking techniques, including cutting legs at a compound angle, accenting the seat with your bandsaw and piecing together the frame.

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Category: All Videos, Home Projects, Premium Videos, Recently Added, and Woodworking Projects.

  • Franklin

    Very Nice and useful project. Since I don’t have a table saw yet, what would be an alternative to cut the legs in the required dimensions (1 1/4″ x 1 1/4″). Thanks

    • George Vondriska

      It’s hard to beat a table saw for ripping parts to size, but the legs could also be ripped on a bandsaw. They could also be planed to the final dimension.

  • vnvet0444

    I am so fed up with you people, I could puke. I am a paid subscriber, but you do not recognize that. If you don’t let me in on the videos soon, real soon, I will cancel you out and get my money back. Thank you in advance for your prompt response to the problems stated above.

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  • G L Brown

    Im also fed up with this site keeps asking me to download adobe flash player ive tried that 6 times it still wont work. I want my money back garver Brown tractorman@charter.net

    • Customer Service

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  • Robert King

    George, from where did you. Obtain your hearing protection? They look handy.

  • bigeerazmus

    I use the loose tenon myself, as I do not have a dedicated mortiser and make all mine own tenons from scraps of wood. Truth is I just hate the time to square up all the mortises. It truly is just as good, in my opinion and a quicker method for completing project. Once glued and together, only you know. Nice project.

  • Mark Kirchhoff

    George, you mention in the video that biscuits could be substituted for the dominoes from the Festool process. That is what I am planning on doing, but am wondering if there is sufficient added strength with the biscuits to hold up. Would there be any significant difference between biscuits and dowels? I am going to alter the dimensions on the lower rails to make sure they are wide enough for the biscuits. Of course, I am losing weight so the stress might not be as great by the time I finish the stool. :-) Great projects you present and very clear instruction and pointing out where the potential errors would come from. Thanks.

    • George Vondriska

      Glad you like the projects.

      The big difference on joinery between dominoes and biscuits would be depth of penetration. Dominoes are more like a true mortise and tenon joint, with greater penetration into the mating pieces. Dowels would be closer to mimicking this than biscuits, and would be a good choice for this project.

      G

      • Mark Kirchhoff

        Thanks. Much as I am always looking for a good reason to purchase a new tool, $1k+ for a Festool Domino Joiner Set might be a bit much for my stylish shop stools at this time. After the beating my wife would impart, I wouldn’t be able to use them – dowels it shall be.

  • George Vondriska

    Check this out if you want to see some background on how the stools developed. http://staging.wwgoa.tnmarketing.net/video/001098_project-development/

    G

  • Shay Campbell

    George, can you talk more about the finish you used on the stools? I don’t have a sprayer so I’ll be applying by hand.

    • George Vondriska

      I’ve got a spray gun so the stools, as you see them here, were shot with lacquer. When I couldn’t spray finishes I liked using furniture oils. It’s very easy to wipe on and make look good, though it’s not very protective. Brush on polyurethane would be a good choice for these stools.

      • Shay Campbell

        I have some polyurethane clear gloss, can I apply furniture oil first and then put a coat of clear gloss on top?

      • George Vondriska

        I’d go with one or the other. I’m not certain about the compatibility between oil and poly. You could check with the poly mfr to determine if it’ll work or not.

        • Shay Campbell

          Very well, I’ll use the clear gloss only on this first stool.

  • Shay Campbell

    One thing I find confusing about the cut list and your instructions is the dimensions for the rails and stretchers. You say to measure from short point to short point. So the top rail needs to be 6″ wide from short point to short point, correct?

    If so, how do you determine the starting size of the piece and the layout for cutting on the tablesaw? If you gave me long point to long point measurements it would be easy to do. I would just set my mitter stop to blade measurement at that specified long point to long point measurement, which is what it looks like you did in the video.

    What I ended up doing was using a piece of scrap and making small cuts until I got to 6″ from small point to small point. This made the long point 6 1/2″.

    Did I do this right or am I reading the instructions wrong?

    • George Vondriska

      I see what you’re saying about the long point to long point dimension giving you an overall outside dimension. For some reason I have a convention in my head of providing the short point measurement, probably from some shop foreman decades ago.

      I generally do what you did. Once I know the number I sneak up on it using a stop block on my miter saw, making test cuts in scrap.

      • Shay Campbell

        Thanks for the clarification. I was certain I misunderstood you yet my work seemed to be turning out right.

  • Steve Kreins

    George, can you tell us about the miter with the stop on it? Looks slick and I’ll bet not cheep, but I do have a birthday coming up ;)
    Since the internet is my only source of instruction, I greatly appreciate your service.
    Blessings,
    Steve